Children’s Literature as Poetry

booksThe other evening, I was reading a children’s book to M entitled “Migrant” by Maxine Trottier and illustrated by Isabelle Arsenault.  My son was quite absorbed in both the writing and the illustration of this book.  The use of metaphor, in this case personification, had him asking such questions as “why does she have to be a tree?”

A good book will inspire a sense of wonder in a child’s mind which is often reflected in the questions posed and the child’s imaginative play.  The thing about poetry and metaphor is that it helps us to recognize the subtleties in everyday conversation and in life.  It helps us to read between the lines, and these conclusions and insights connect our inner life to our outer life and vice versa.

While M may not fully comprehend the complexities of metaphor, the exposure to it is planting seeds and in the meantime, speaking to his soul .

“What would it be like to be a tree with roots sunk deeply into the earth-to watch the seasons passing around  you the same way the wind passes through your branches?

When fall came and your leaves fell, they would blow away, but you would remain. You’d watch the black and orange butterflies set out on wobbly flight, feel the days grow shorter, look up in the sky and see a line of geese winging south again.

And then you would sleep, wrapped in snow, until the sky-high honking of geese woke you in the spring. Now that would be something.” (Migrant, 2011)

I would love to hear what children’s books have spoken to you?

 

Progress

progress

It’s been a while since I have worked on this 3×4 foot oil on masonite.  This is just a portion of the actual painting.  In the meantime, I continue to “work small,” which involves mostly scribbling in sketchbooks between the busyness of motherhood and work.

Until next time!

Storytelling: Page One

For a couple of years now, I have been asking myself the question “how can I share my story?” And also, “why do I want/need to tell my story?” Maybe not my whole story, but aspects of it.  Like most people, I find autobiography and storytelling to be a powerful medium.  It is healing, didactic and inspiring, to name but a few things. Those that have gone before me, act as Polaris in some of life’s darker moments.  When we engage in storytelling or read an autobiography we learn that we are not alone in what we call the “human condition.” More importantly though, we learn that it is perfectly okay to be human.
page one

I flew back to Vancouver for the birth of my new niece.  It would be my sister’s fifth baby and I was excited to be her doula.

I was home, but only for five days.  My Dad picked me up from the airport.  He commented that “I was looking older” (gee, thanks).  After catching up over brunch, my Dad dropped me off at my sister’s house.

To be continued.